Home Explore Cycling in Victoria: how to ride like a local

Cycling in Victoria: how to ride like a local

The article is written by Paola Bianchi     Cover photo by pixabay.com

From early morning to late evening is common to see cyclists sliding all over the city. Students ride for their everyday commute to their studies, workers cycle to get to their office or workplace (using comfy shoes that will be swapped later for adequate working attire), and amateurs cycling groups ride together for several km wearing the team’s cycling uniforms (they may even have sponsors!).

Cycling in Victoria is fantastic. It’s not a new thing but is getting trendy!

1 ridersPic by Mr Michael Phams

Riding a bike is a pleasure, a great way to keep fit and it is a truly sustainable form of travelling.
Plus, you get to know the city with other ayes.

Melbourne residents had embraced this way of living, and everyone is welcome to join them!

Leading up to 31 October 2011, communities across Victoria and other states of Australia will be passing a human sized earth globe from suburb to suburb and town to town until it reaches Canberra. This is the Earth Relay.  The hope is that the relay will generate media and community attention along its passage to parliament and the Earth Dome will act as a symbol of hope and optimism for a cleaner, safer world. Climate Action Moreland hosted a leg of the Earth Relay on Saturday 8 October 2011 from 11.30 am to 12.30 pm outside the Brunswick Mechanics Institute, corner of Glenlyon Road and Sydney Road, Brunswick.  Members of Climate Action Moreland sent a message about how we think the carbon price can be improved, particularly increasing the 5% target. Once the legislation is passed through Federal parliament in Canberra, the Earth Dome will be packed up and shipped to Durban for the Durban Conference of the Parties climate negotiations - COP17 - to be held in South Africa from 28 November - 9 December 2011, and with it will go our pride that finally Australia is acting on climate change and our hope that this will help deliver progress on climate change on the international stage.

Leading up to 31 October 2011, communities across Victoria and other states of Australia will be passing a human sized earth globe from suburb to suburb and town to town until it reaches Canberra. This is the Earth Relay. The hope is that the relay will generate media and community attention along its passage to parliament and the Earth Dome will act as a symbol of hope and optimism for a cleaner, safer world.
Climate Action Moreland hosted a leg of the Earth Relay on Saturday 8 October 2011 from 11.30 am to 12.30 pm outside the Brunswick Mechanics Institute, corner of Glenlyon Road and Sydney Road, Brunswick. Members of Climate Action Moreland sent a message about how we think the carbon price can be improved, particularly increasing the 5% target.
Once the legislation is passed through Federal parliament in Canberra, the Earth Dome will be packed up and shipped to Durban for the Durban Conference of the Parties climate negotiations – COP17 – to be held in South Africa from 28 November – 9 December 2011, and with it will go our pride that finally Australia is acting on climate change and our hope that this will help deliver progress on climate change on the international stage.

Pic from Takver

To be part of this lifestyle is good to know basic (but crucial) tips:

Know the local rules.

Bicycles are considered as vehicles, meaning that riders have same rights and responsibilities than a car driver. As a cyclist, you are required to comply general road rules as any car or moto would do. For example, keep your ride on your left, stop when passengers are getting off a tram, understand when you need to give way and how to enter a roundabout. Most bike accidents occur at intersections, so watch out here!

A car uses the light signal to do a turn, uses the blinker. When riding, you must use your right hand to signal when turning (you are not obliged to hand signal when turning left but it is a good idea to do so)

Oh! and no holding your phone in your hands, please! You can hook it to the bike and use the hands-free mode for calls, GPS or music.

Read the signs.

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed at the beginning with so many new road signs, but pay attention, and you will find them easy to understand.

4 signsPic from baudman

The mandatory stuff.
In many countries, using a helmet is not compulsory and is even considered a silly practice. But in Australia safety is a primary public concern. And we are glad that it is taken seriously!

Helmets are mandatory and need to be securely fitted and fastened. Be aware that police can issue a warning or a fine if not wearing a proper helmet. Don’t get upset; it’s in your best interest!

Also, proper bike brakes and a warning device like a bell are required. You may understand clearly why brakes are needed, but a bell? Keep reading!

Share the path.
Bicycles are not allowed to ride on footpaths, but sometimes cyclist lanes and pedestrian’s paths are mixed. In these cases, keep left and always give way to pedestrians. You may need to warn them with the bell!

5 shared pathPic by Paola Bianchi

Light your bike.
At night use a white light on the front, a red light on the back (they can be flashing or steady lights) and a red reflector on the back.
Be seen at night is not to be taken lightly. Look at this short video.

Use your lanes.
Where possible always use Bike Lanes. They are marked in green colour on the road. Bikers have priority and cars are not allowed to drive on these lanes (unless they are turning into an intersection). Also, you can use the Bus Line (unless otherwise signed) but you must give bus priority.

6 bike lanePic by Paola Bianchi

 

Check out this great video that summarises all these recommendations.
We hope that this encourages you to go out and happily ride your bike!

 

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Study
in SYDNEY
for $5,600
per year

The price includes one year of tuition fees and Student visa assistance from a registered migration agent. Valid until June 30, 2024.